Speaking Language

We must move beyond simple claims that writing ‘gives voice’, or is a form of ‘expression’. Language is both before and after the fact: it comes as retrospection and speculation. And its politicization runs deeper than mere content, the surface upon which many young writers roam and remain. We must look at the container that holds the water. Continue reading

Jonathan Edwards’ “Gen”: A Human Comedy

It’s hard to find a funny poet – it seems that the vast majority of us are doomed to sit around bemoaning the sad state of the world as it is/was/always will be. It’s even harder to find someone who can be funny without being either superficial or depressing. But somehow, despite the many ways the world has changed for the worse in the four years since My Family and Other Superheroes, Jonathan Edwards has done it: he’s got me laughing again. Continue reading

How to Break Into Screenwriting

Screenwriting is a discipline most of us are unacquainted with before going to university. You may have a sound knowledge of film or television, know your Vertigos from your Borgens or your Mudbounds, and never have encountered a single screenplay. This is normal. Starting-out in screenwriting only requires ideas, and the drive and imagination to visualise them. Continue reading

Preti Taneja’s We That Are Young

We That Are Young is the debut novel from Warwick academic and human rights activist Preti Taneja. The novel is a modern reworking of Shakespeare’s King Lear, transplanting the tragedy from the castles of Medieval Britain into the meeting rooms of the hospitality industry in modern day India. It was awarded the Desmond Elliott Prize for new fiction in 2018. Continue reading

A Brief Guide to Getting Published

The hardest part of getting your work published in literary magazines is not the submission process or finding the magazines, or even finding the inspiration: it is the motivation to start, and beyond that the motivation to keep going once the rejections start to pile up in your inbox. The same inbox that you cannot bring yourself to make a special email folder for because of the thick income of template ‘unfortunately, the piece is not for us’ from editors. Continue reading

Review of Tim Leach’s Smile of the Wolf

9781788544115“The Smile of the Wolf” tells the story of two friends; Kjaran and Gunnar and how their hunt for a ghost turns into a struggle for survival, honour and love.

Tim Leach’s book paints a painfully vivid yet entrancing image of eleventh century Iceland. It is a harsh land whose people have laws to match. Yet it is also a beautiful land, a place of solace for those wanting to escape the yoke of kings. The setting reflects the story – the contrasts of the land embrace the contrasts of the characters. Kjaran is a skald, a poet, who has never killed but shapes the world with his songs. Gunnar is a battle-hardened warrior, who is often at loss for words. The delicacy and hardness of Iceland can be found in these two men. Continue reading